State of IPv6

I have been considering upgrading to IPv6 for years but I was always held back a bit because none of the service providers I have access to support IPv6 natively.  In other words, in order for me to use IPv6 I would have to go through a tunnel broker and something in the back of my head just screamed “SLOW”.

Now I have gone through the process anyway and I am in fact quite surprised about the speed.  Where I had expected a massive slow down in fact some sites are noticeable quicker through my IPv6 tunnel.  This is because my service provider (Telekom Malaysia) while fairly quick inside Malaysia has got incredible slow international lines.  In fact – usually the only international line that is reasonable quick is the one to Singapore.  Fortunately the tunnel provider has got a POP in Singapore, so I reckon that I take advantage of the fact that Singapore got much faster international connectivity and the fact that tunnel provider itself got a massively quick international backbone.

Anyway – that is not really what I wanted to write about here.  What I wanted to write about is the sorry state of IPv6 deployment.  Going through Alexa’s top-100 sites it is quite shocking how few are actually using IPv6.  Google is about the only one that is consistently dual-stacked (ie. both IPv4 and IPv6).  Facebook claim to be running IPv6 but it works so poorly that it is unusable.

Noticeable sites that do not use IPv6 at all (and all from top-100) are:

  • Amazon
  • BBC
  • Yahoo
  • Baidu
  • Windows Live
  • LinkedIn
  • Ebay
  • Bing
  • WordPress

The list does not end there – this was just some of the more surprising examples.

Personally I am shocked – there’s no other word for it.  We’re talking companies who’s core business is the Internet and yet – knowing that they could help push the Internet in the right direction, the only two companies that are consistently supporting IPv6 is Google and Wikipedia (yes Facebook tried a bit but it is not working – in fact they got documentation online on how to disable IPv6 if Facebook is slow).

Anyway – cow.dk – including this blog – is of course 100 dual stacked and if you got IPv6 enabled, you are in fact browsing it using IPv6 right now.